3D-Printing Solves Construction Problems

3D-Printing Solves Construction Problems
3D printing is becoming more and more affordable and with that, the possibility of transforming disaster reconstruction, helping homeless families around the world.

Digital production techniques such as 3D printing, which directly translates a digital file into a physical product, are becoming increasingly popular on small and larger scales.

Homes for the Homeless

In Amsterdam architects are building a 3D-printed house—a process becoming more and more affordable and with that, the possibility of transforming disaster reconstruction, helping homeless families around the world. The architects say initially their plan was to develop ways to build homes in a faster and more efficient way, while making use of newly developed substances derived from bio-based raw materials.

“We are currently printing with bioplastics, which are 80 percent made from vegetable oil,” Tosja Backer, expo-manager at the 3D Canal House, told reporters.

Digital production techniques such as 3D printing, which directly translates a digital file into a physical product, are becoming increasingly popular on small and larger scales.

Read the full article: 3D Printing and the Future of Disaster Relief

Offices in Dubai

In Dubai, the first 3D-printed office building is now a reality. The building, constructed using WinSun’s tilt-up technology—where floor, walls and ceiling are printed on their sides in 2D layer by layer, then tilted vertically—though ingenious is likely limited to single-story buildings. Ideally, future printing systems would be located at the job site, but the Dubai office building was printed in WinSun’s factory in China and the modules then cut in half for easier transportation. Once at the site, the pieces were reassembled.

Read the full article: Dubai has 3D Printed an Entire Building

Tennessee-based startup Branch Technology has announced it will begin construction of Chattanooga’s first 3D-printed home this July. After holding the Freeform Home Design Challenge, in which anyone could submit a design for a single-family home using Branch Technology’s innovative 3D printing Cellular Fabrication (C-Fab) technique, the winning design, Curve Appeal was chosen. Designed by architecture firm WATG Chicago, the concept will be constructed starting in July.

The C-Fab technique, differs slightly from other 3D-printing construction methods because it employs a customized, industrial robotic arm to extrude a carbon-fiber, reinforced-ABS plastic material into complex, large-scale structures. The structures make up the inner framework of the building, which can then be sprayed with traditional low-cost building materials such as foam insulation or concrete to make a strong, hybrid building structure. Thus, the building walls can benefit from both reduced weight of the 3D printing materials and the structural integrity of concrete.

Read the full article: Branch Technology to begin construction of 3D printed house this July

 

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